Thursday Doors, 5/11/20: Farnese 3.

We continue the tour of Farnese: in this post one church and one passage. This was almost three weeks ago, the last time we got together with Flavia, and I’m missing it.

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After discovering last week’s cat doors, we ascended to the old part of town proper. In a square behind the corner we bumped into a rather remarkable church and opposite was a less fancy but completely adorable passage.

The church is called Parrocchia Santissimo Salvatore and it would undoubtedly make a top five attraction in any lesser country but in Italy it’s just another church. In the gallery are some images from the inside. There were not many doors as such but imagination goes a long way.

Just opposite I spotted the grand entrance that you can see above. It wasn’t clear whether it was public or private but I boldly went in and discovered an interesting passage and courtyard that has seen grander times but to me it was equally magnificent as the church.

Inside the church I saw it written Magna et mirabilia. The translation is not simple, it appears, something like many wonderful, but magna sounds exactly how my name is pronounced. Maybe my next blog should be called Manja the Magna and her Miracles. ๐Ÿ˜€

(ADD-IT: As Susanne busted me in a comment: magna is NOT pronounced the same as my name but rather with a hard g. I mixed magna and mangia (Eat!) which in Roman dialect is indeed pronounced Manja, to rhyme with lasagna.)

In other news… but you know. Be well and dance as if the whole world is watching.


For Norm Framptonโ€™s Thursday Doors challenge

39 thoughts on “Thursday Doors, 5/11/20: Farnese 3.

  1. I agree, there is a Mexican feel to some of these pictures. Being from one of the lessor countries, if I saw this church I would swerve to the curb to get out and look. I’m glad you were bold enough to enter, the shots you took are fascinating.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Dan. ๐Ÿ™‚ Lesser country? I don’t know, seems pretty grand to me. Bold to enter, you mean because of the circumstances? There was nobody in, or maybe a sole person in front. But I’m never really at east in a church. I always feel they were built with this purpose – to intimidate.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, Helen. ๐Ÿ™‚ See, this weekend was sunny and calm and I could go anywhere I wanted – as long as I’m home by midnight as a Cinderella – and yet I didn’t go anywhere but for short dog walks. The mood was not such.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. So I guess he has to stay in Rome all the time.
        If someone comes from another area here, it’s 12 days quarantine and isolation before they can go anywhere or do anything.

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  2. Manja and the Miracles…sounds like a good name for a Mo-Town act. Oh, wait I think Smokey Robinson already has copyrights on that ๐Ÿ˜€
    I’m glad you pushed on and brought us along your continuing explorations. I’m most fascinated by that wide triple door with the long bar/board to secure it closed. Excellent post!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Okay, so exactly HOW is your named pronounced? When I look at the spelling “Manja”, I pronounce the “j” as “y” so it sounds like Manya, but no? That’s not right? It should be a hard “g” as in MaGna Carta? signed, perplexed in Canada.

    In other observations, the light in Italy is exquisite and everything glows in it. Even just another church.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh, Susanne, you busted me. I will add an explanation in my post. I mixed everything up. It’s obvious that I never learned Latin. Magna is indeed pronounced with a hard g, whereas my name rhymes with “lasagna”. I was thinking of the word mangia (meaning Eat!) which in Roman dialect is indeed pronounced like my name. In regular Italian it’s mangia with a g like in George. Thank you for pointing it out! And yes, the light is everything.

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