Thursday Doors, 24/10/19: Piran

Today we discover a hidden corner of Piran with plenty of colours and doors, a bicycle, a dressed-up tree, and an ugly message on the wall. And we do it twice. All this is Piran, Slovenia, Europe, the world.

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This part of Piran I must have visited in the past already but I have never really seen it. This summer I was there twice while walking the dog in late afternoon.

The better half of the photos is from July, and one month later I found myself there again but noticed completely different doors. It’s hard when you can’t even trust yourself.

I’m still uuuhing and ahhhing over the new effect discovered by chance. Click on any photo below – preferably on the last one because captions are not visible in the gallery – and you’ll see, or won’t if your screen isn’t big enough to display it effectively. I haven’t seen anything like this on any other of the many blogs I follow. It must be new.

I notice that some photos are not sharp enough. Ah well. It might be my camera failing, or the light, or my eyes, or a bit of everything.

But still, these doors are loud, colourful and proud, as if to counter that ugly “white Europe” message on the wall. Even you needed black paint to write it, stupid.

For Norm Frampton’s Thursday Doors challenge.

47 thoughts on “Thursday Doors, 24/10/19: Piran

  1. Windows and exterior doors are walled for tax reasons. Piran (and the entire territory of present-day Slovenia) at the beginning of the 19th century, Napoleon occupied and imposed stringent taxes, including windows and doors.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. It is hard to understand the initative behind that tax law! I suppose they were trying to be egalitarian suggesting if you had more than one chimney you were richer and could pay more tax. However, if you were really poor, how on earth could you do without a chimney at all……

        Liked by 2 people

  2. Fantastic gallery, Manja. I had to do the full view on my desktop as it didn’t work on my phone. It is so pretty with the individually blurred enlarged backdrop to each photo. And the door today are just Wow. Piran is such a colourful city! Winding lanes I could wander around soaking up the atmosphere.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I’m out of breath from all of that up and down. The steep streets seem very reminiscent of Massa Marretima to me.
    Two ghost doors and a ghost window, lots of fun vibrant colours, and a Manja doofie as well! This post has all the important elements 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hehe, thank you, Norm. I say that you’re right when you say that I like reflections. I’m always surprised when I catch myself in one. It’s like seeing a door friend. Piran is not all that up and down, most of the town is on level zero, but the grand church and the walls are above.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Wonderful doors, Manja, but that cobblestone street looks like it could be treacherous to walk on in bad weather. I like the way you captured the angle in several photos. I always like seeing places where people just built on the land the way it was, instead of modifying it.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Dan. Oh, bad weather here means that the wind is such that it’s not a good idea to go out at all. So yes, treacherous is right. The last sentence needs some explanation, I’m afraid. How exactly do you mean? Which photos make you say that?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. The buildings that are built along the sloping road. We do/did that in some places, but in others, they leveled the hills. In Seattle, for example, they removed several big hills in the city.

        Liked by 1 person

  5. I really like the horizontal display option. All beautiful photos and yes, the childrens home writing is upsetting.But maybe they were able to use it for a teachable moment for the children. Let’s hope!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ahh, you’re uplifting, good to see. Thank you, Katy, also for the follow. It may be that this place was closed for the summer, but the writing didn’t look new at all. How can anyone pass this daily on the way to work in this building and not do anything about it is beyond me.

      Liked by 1 person

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